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Saturday, June 24, 2017

Resources for LGBTQ+ Mormons and their friends

Okay, here's a list of a few resources I've found that have been helpful to me, in no particular order. Some of these are things that I hope will help LGBTQ+ Mormons directly cause they've helped me feel like I'm not the only one like me, and others can help those who have LGBTQ+ loved ones to understand and empathize with that experience. 

Affirmation.org is a good site that has a bunch of resources for a bunch of LGBTQ+ people who are or have been associated with the LDS church. They have both online resources, some Facebook groups, and conferences and such.

MormonandGay.lds.org is a site maintained by the LDS church which I wish more people were more familiar with. It has several videos and stories from mostly lesbian, gay, and bisexual Mormons and their families. Church doctrine doesn't have many real answers for transgender people, unfortunately, so there's not much on their site in that regard. It's pretty good for what it is, and it tries to promote love and acceptance.

This essay contains a pretty comprehensive look at the LDS church's position and how it has changed throughout history towards specifically gay and lesbian people. He puts LGBT in the title, but again, it kind of leaves out trans people, and it doesn't really address bisexual people, either. There's not a ton to draw on from official church statements, but it is important to mention the omission. I haven't read the rest of the site where this essay is found, but it's MormonLGBTQuestions.com, and it might be useful, too.

This post on Josh Weed's blog was the first thing I ever read that talked about being Mormon and gay. His case is somewhat unique, given that he's married to a woman, though they're certainly not the only mixed-orientation couple around. At any rate, this was pretty eye-opening to me a few years back when I read it, and maybe it will be helpful for others, too.

Finally, my friend Ben has an awesome blog which has been a good resource for me as I first tried to understand what it might mean to be Mormon and LGBT. It also gave me a good example for what it might look like if and when I decided to come out. This post is a good place to start reading his story.


If you don't know, LGBT individuals are often at a higher risk for suicide. Several studies show this, including one from BYU, which you can find reported here in the Universe, BYU's newspaper. Therefore, here's a list of hotlines and suicide prevention resources.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

TheTrevorProject.org is a suicide prevention program specifically for LGBT youth. 866-488-7386

Project Semicolon is another suicide prevention project tailored to people with a variety of mental illnesses. 

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has this page about how to recognize suicide warning signs.